APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: When does incivility lead to counterproductive work behavior? Roles of job involvement, task interdependence, and gender

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Title

When does incivility lead to counterproductive work behavior? Roles of job involvement, task interdependence, and gender

Available Online http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/ocp/22/2/194/
Publication Date April 2017
Author Jennifer L. Welbourne and Ana M. Sariol
Source Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Source Type Journal Article
Summary

This study examines the relationship between exposure to incivility and counterproductive work behavior (CWB). Using a sample of 250 employees, results suggest that the relationship between exposure to incivility and production deviance and withdrawal was moderated by job involvement, such that higher levels of job involvement strengthened the relationship. This relationship was also moderated by task interdependence such that the relationship was strongest for women with high levels of task interdependence. The study concludes that the findings have implications regarding susceptibility to negative effects of incivility and the conditions that amplify the effect.

Keywords Incivility, counterproductive work behavior, job involvement
Reference

Welbourne, J. L., & Sariol, A. M. (2017). When does incivility lead to counterproductive work behavior? Roles of job involvement, task interdependence, and gender. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 22(2), 194-206.

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